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Survey: Half of Louisiana high schoolers have vaped

NEW ORLEANS — While there is a rise in hospitalizations and deaths linked to vaping, it's use is also on the rise. Half of high school students in Louisiana have tried e-cigarettes according to a recent report. About 2,700 Louisiana high school and middle school students from randomly selected schools filled out a survey for Tobacco Free Living. About 1-out-of-4 middle school students and 51.5% of high school students claimed to have used an e-cigarette at least once. "Those rates for us, is a concern," said Tonia Moore, Director of Louisiana Campaign for Tobacco Free Living. Nearly 32% of high school students currently vape. That's more than twice the number of high school users from 2017 and three times the number from 2015. Use among middle school students is rising too. 15.4% of middle school students used e-cigarettes in the past 30 days of the time they filled out the survey. Most students claim they tried vaping out of curiosity, with Juul being the most popular brand. "That product has really been targeted and marketed toward the

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New survey shows vaping is increasing in Louisiana’s students, names JUUL as brand of choice

Even as the federal government investigates 34 deaths across the U.S. related to vaping, interest in e-cigarettes among Louisiana students is increasing, according to a new survey. The Louisiana Campaign for Tobacco-Free Living found that the number of students reporting using vape products has doubled since 2017 in the state. In 2019, about 32% of high school students and 15% of middle school students in Louisiana reported vaping more than once, according to the survey, which was conducted this year. About one in four middle school students and half of high school students have tried vaping. Schools were randomly selected for the anonymous survey, which was optional for students to complete. About 2,700 students were surveyed. Most students who responded to the survey said they tried vaping because they were curious. For students in middle school, the average age at which they first tried vaping was 12. For students in high school, the average age was 14. Those who vaped more regularly said they were influenced by a friend or family member who vaped. E-cigarette

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VAPE RATES DOUBLE OVER TWO YEARS FOR YOUTH

Middle and high school vaping rates have doubled since 2017 in Louisiana according to data from the Louisiana Campaign for Tobacco-Free Living. In 2019 an estimated 32% of high schoolers and 15% of middle schoolers reported using vape products more than once. Tobacco-Free Living Director Tonia Moore says it’s a growing trend.   “If you look at that report, then you will see that the number of high school vapers has nearly tripled since 2015,” says Moore.   55 percent of those who reported vaping say they used a JUUL product, the most popular form of vape.   Smoking rates in the state continue to decline among youth at the same time that vaping rates have exploded. Moore says that appears to be because kids aren’t even aware the product is dangerous.   “They don’t see this as a harmful product, and actually the data says they aren’t even sure if this product is less harmful (than traditional cigarettes) or not,” says Moore.   Moore says the state has seen 26 vaping related cases of illness

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Cullen expands smoke-free ordinance

CULLEN – This week, Cullen City Council unanimously voted to extend the state’s current smoke-free ordinance to include bars and gaming establishments within Cullen. “The Louisiana Campaign for Tobacco-Free Living (TFL) and members of the Coalition for a Tobacco Free Louisiana (CTFLA) applaud the members of the Cullen City Council for their vote,” the TFL wrote in a press release. When the ordinance goes into effect by May 1, Cullen will become the sixth municipality in Northern Louisiana to go smoke-free and 22nd in the state of Louisiana. “With the passing of this ordinance, Cullen is saying ‘we care enough to protect everyone who works in Cullen, La.’,” said Feamula Bradley, TFL Regional Manager. “The failure to protect the health of all employees from the dangers of secondhand smoke is an oversight by the state, but communities like Cullen are working to overcome this oversight.”

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Boyce expands smoke-free ordinance

ALEXANDRIA, La. (KALB) - The town of Boyce is expanding Louisiana’s smoke-free ordinance. The town council voted for and passed the smoke-free measure on May 14. It's an extension of the state's smoke-free act from 2007, which prohibited smoking in most public places including all restaurants with or without attached bars Although it didn't include standing bars and gaming facilities, individual cities and towns can choose to further protect everyone at these businesses. In 2012, Alexandria banned smoking at any restaurant, bar, and gaming facility, Boyce is now following suit. While the town doesn't have any of these facilities, Jennifer Gilchrist, Regional Manager of the Louisiana Campaign for Tobacco Living said their decision to join the smoke-free ordinance right now is a good idea. "They do have vaping devices that people use and these are included in their municipal ordinance,” Gilchrist explained. “Because they were not even in existence when the state smoke-free act passed." She also added, “We believe that

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Lawmakers push for a smoke-free Louisiana

BATON ROUGE, LA (WAFB) - A legislative committee is working on a smoke-free plan for the State of Louisiana. In 2007, Louisiana’s Smoke-Free Air Act went into effect, prohibiting smoking in most public areas, including workplaces, universities, and restaurants, but it did not include bars and gaming facilities. A recent study found the act doesn’t go far enough to protect all of Louisiana’s workers from the harmful effects of secondhand smoke. “I know for one, it would be to include bars and gaming, and then the other loopholes are allowing smoking in convention halls and centers during Mardi Gras balls as well as tobacco expos. That’s a loophole. There may be some nursing home exemptions as well as hotel/motel. Also, it needs to be increased to include vaping and e-cigarettes,” said Tonia Moore, director of Tobacco Prevention and Control. More than a dozen Louisiana cities, including Baton Rouge, have already passed city-wide smoking bans that include bars and gaming facilities.

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